Mentorship Program

We all know that overwhelming feeling while going through a crisis. With your OPLM membership, you get an impassioned Peer Parent Mentor to let you know right away that you are NOT alone.

Meet your mentor

Definition: An experienced and trusted guide/friend

Come grow with us

Get connected and feel like you belong

Meet your mentor who will reach out to introduce themselves and share their story

Be invited to support groups so when you enter the Zoom groups you will see a familiar face

Get help navigating the site and be steered towards the OPLM resources you need

Connection with parents who understand and having the opportunity to feel seen, heard and valued without judgment is healing. I’m so grateful.

– Jose, OPLM member

Our Mentors

Tippy H.

Leads Speaker Talks

“I became a Peer mentor to be there for other parents who are dealing with a child who is struggling. I want to help support parents through this journey they are on with their child. I understand the lonely feeling as a parent with a child that struggles with addiction and mental illness. Once I started talking to others, I was amazed how many people can relate to the roller coaster of emotions. I find that the weight on my shoulders lessons the more I talk about it. As a Mentor I want to be the ‘safe space’ for others. I can be that friendly face as they enter a support group or share in a laugh together.”

Phil B.

Leads Men’s Support Groups

“I became a mentor because of several transformative experiences in my life over the last 24 months. Essentially, these experiences are related to the concepts of “service,” which I’ve learned (or re-learned) through Al Anon and through Parental Support Groups like OPLM: You’ve got to give it away to keep it; If not me, who, if not now when?; Step 12. Kindled by my own spiritual rebirth since June of 2020, I have humbly tried to be of service to friends, family and strangers (my heavenly neighbors or ‘brothers’).”

Casie F.

Leads Speaker Talks

“I became a mentor to be there for others in the way others were there for me when I was in crisis. I have been a mentor in the past and have found that I get as much out of it as I give.”

Liz W.

Leads Meditation and Women’s Support Groups

“I became a mentor because of the support, friendship, and growth I received from my mentor over the last two years. When I had two teenagers in treatment in residential programs two years ago, I was a real mess. I felt extremely anxious, depressed, and disillusioned about how my life and my kids lives were turning out. I started attending parent support groups in desperation for hope, connection, and understanding. Through those groups I found a mentor who has stood beside me and helped me weather the storms, celebrate the victories, but most importantly helped me focus on my growth and my life, aside from the ups and downs of my kids. I am forever grateful for network of parents in OPLM and for my mentor! I hope to be able to help provide this support to another parent.”

Teri T.

Leads Coffee and Gratitude Support Groups

“I was inspired to become a peer parent due to all the support and meaningful friendships I have developed with other parents in my recovery process. I felt so alone and inadequate as a mother early in this process. Through my sharing with other parents in a similar struggle, I’ve learned that I can heal and take better care of myself. Being with these parents has not only helped to define me, I know better who I want to be when I’m in their company. The unexpected result is a better relationship with my son as well as most of the people in my life. Lisa, another parent with a son in recovery, always says…”This is a journey I would never wish on anyone, and one I wouldn’t trade for the world.” It’s so true. I can’t imagine where I’d be without this community of loving parents.”

Marcie S.

Leads Coffee and Gratitude Support Groups

“I became a parent mentor to try to directly reach more parents. I remember feeling so alone and isolated before my son went to a program and even when he was in wilderness. I hope to be that gentle, kind, and compassionate listener and support to other parents. I want to encourage parents to start slow and when ready accept the help and connection that is there when they are ready. For me I had to be willing to accept support and it took time. Having a mentor to stand beside you can make so much difference especially when they share their experience. In OPLM we are a huge support network and are all parents that are on this journey together. If I can reach even a few parents and support them the way others have done for me I will be grateful and consider that a success.”

Jenny L.

Leads Trauma Support Groups

“I became a mentor because I wanted to have the opportunity to be present with someone the way others were there with me when my son was in wilderness and treatment programs. Having someone who had been through a similar situation listen to my story and share theirs with me helped me to feel less alone. Connecting with another parent gave me the courage to do my own work and eventually helped to transform my pain–the fear and desperation and guilt–into something beautiful: empathy, compassion, and gratitude. The support that I was given rippled out into benefits for my whole family because of the healing it brought to me. I would like to be able to support someone else in this same way on their path toward healing.”

Lisa S.

Leads Families with Kids in Sober Living and Alumni Programs Support Groups

“I am honored to be a Parent Mentor because one of the most difficult challenges I’ve faced as a mother was when, as a young teen, my son began struggling with substance use and mental health. The pain, stress, chaos, and fear was devastating and the shame and judgment was overwhelming. I felt very alone and hopeless. When I began to attend Al-Anon, I found care, compassion, and finally a place where I belonged. This became the catalyst for recovering myself – doing the hard work, learning self-care, and accepting and embracing my own journey. I found my purpose in life – working with and supporting other families who are walking with me on the shared path of recovery.”

Michelle H.

Leads Women’s Support Groups

“I became a mentor because I wanted to have the opportunity to be present with someone the way others were there with me when my son was in wilderness and treatment programs. Having someone who had been through a similar situation listen to my story and share theirs with me helped me to feel less alone. Connecting with another parent gave me the courage to do my own work and eventually helped to transform my pain–the fear and desperation and guilt–into something beautiful: empathy, compassion, and gratitude. The support that I was given rippled out into benefits for my whole family because of the healing it brought to me. I would like to be able to support someone else in this same way on their path toward healing.”

Holly O.

Leads Meditation and Families with Young Adults Support Groups

“I became a mentor because I wanted to help struggling parents develop tools that could increase their self-care and overall mindfulness.”

Sherine J.

Leads Program Exclusive Support Groups

“I became a mentor because if I could help just one other family manage the highs and lows, weather the storms and enjoy the blessings, of parenting a child with substance use and mental health difficulties, to have them not feel alone, gives me purpose and hope.”

Need Help Now: Let us point you in the direction of other resources. If this is an emergency, please call 911.
If you or someone you know is in crisis, call the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline at 988.